All in all not a good day for the liberal wags.

Vatican pressure said to have forced editor´s resignation

Editor of Jesuit´s America magazine forced to resign under Vatican pressure.

Fired or resigned read the the reports from around the world re: Fr. Thomas Reese.

 

 

 

Vatican pressure said to have forced editor´s resignation

 

 

 The editor of the US Jesuits´ prestigious America magazine has resigned amid

widespread speculation about the involvement of the Congregation for the

Doctrine of the Faith, although neither the official announcement nor the

Catholic News Service report tension between Fr Thomas Reese and the Vatican.

 

The National Catholic Reporter says the resignation caps five years of tensions

and exchanges among the congregation, which was headed at the time by Cardinal

Joseph Ratzinger, now Pope Benedict XVI, the Jesuits and Reese.

 

According to one source of the paper, the communication about Reese´s fate was

carried on between the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and the

superior general of the Jesuits, Dutch Fr. Peter-Hans Kolvenbach, with the

content then relayed to Reese´s Jesuit superiors in the United States.

 

In February 2002, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith proposed

creating a three-member commission of censors for the magazine, though the idea

was never implemented. According to sources, the congregation told the Jesuits

that the action was in response to concern from bishops in the United States.

 

America´s sister magazine - the Italian Jesuits´ La Civila´ Cattolica - has its

content reviewed by the Vatican as part of its editorial process.

 

Catholic News Service says that Fr Reese announced on Friday that he is leaving

on 1 June after seven years as its editor in chief. It says Fr Drew

Christiansen, an associate editor since 2002, who is widely known for his work

on Catholic social teaching and international justice and peace issues, is

replacing him.

 

Fr Christiansen said: "Fr Reese greatly improved the magazine, adding news

coverage, color and the Web edition. His technical expertise, in this age of

new media, will be greatly missed."

 

He added: "By inviting articles that covered different sides of disputed issues,

Father Reese helped make America a forum for intelligent discussion of questions

facing the church and the country today."

 

SOURCE

Editor of Jesuit´s America magazine forced to resign under Vatican pressure

(National Catholic Reporter 6/5/05)

Father Thomas Reese leaves America magazine (Catholic News Service 6/5/05)

 

 

 

 

Leading US Catholic is forced out by Vatican TaipeiTimes

By Tom Heneghan  08 May 2005

A leading Roman Catholic commentator has resigned as editor of an influential

Jesuit magazine in the United States amid reports the Vatican doctrinal

department formerly run by Pope Benedict had demanded his removal for being

"off-message" on condoms.

 

Father Thomas Reese, aged 60, announced his unexpected departure from America

magazine on Friday. The National Catholic Reporter, the US weekly that broke

the story later on Friday, said the Vatican had objected to articles in the

magazine discussing condom use to prevent Aids, and on homosexual priests and

secretive church disciplinary measures.

 

The National Catholic Reporter, quoting unnamed sources, said: "The resignation

caps five years of tensions and exchanges among the Congregation (for the

Doctrine of the Faith), which was headed at the time by Cardinal Joseph

Ratzinger, now Pope Benedict XVI, the Jesuits and Reese."

 

The Congregation, the modern successor to the Inquisition, disciplined many

critical theologians under the firm leadership of Cardinal Ratzinger from 1981

to 2005.

 

According to the paper, Reese's Jesuit superiors told him he had to quit after

he returned to America's New York headquarters from reporting on Benedict's

election.

 

 

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Published on TaipeiTimes

http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/world/archives/2005/04/21/2003251347

 

 

 

 

New Pope Benedict XVI to follow a conservative path

 

DOGMATIC: German Joseph Ratzinger, now known as Pope Benedict XVI, was elected

head of the church for his traditional views on abortion and homosexuality

 

AP , VATICAN CITY

Thursday, Apr 21, 2005,Page 6

 

Advertising  A day before he was elected Pope, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger made

clear the type of church he wanted: one that rigidly maintained the doctrines

he himself had upheld as guardian of church orthodoxy, where there were

absolute truths on matters such as abortion, celibacy and homosexuality.

With his election Tuesday in one of the fastest papal votes in a century, Pope

Benedict XVI will most certainly build upon the uncompromising hard line on

doctrine that he charted under Pope John Paul II.

 

His election will thrill conservatives seeking a consolidation of John Paul's

policies. It will alienate more liberal Catholics, particularly in Europe and

North America, who had hoped that after 26 years, a more progressive Pope might

take the helm of the world's 1.1 billion Catholics.

 

And it will likely temper hopes around the world of improved relations with

other religions.

 

"If he continues as Pope the way he was as a cardinal, I think we will see a

polarized church," said David Gibson, a former Vatican Radio reporter and

author of The Coming Catholic Church.

 

 

German Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger holds a glass of beer during his visit at the

Bavarian cloister Andechs in this 1998 file photo. Ratzinger of Germany has

been elected Pope to lead the Roman Catholic Church, a cardinal announced on

Tuesday. He has chosen Pope Benedict XVI as his papal name, the cardinal said.

 

 

"He has said himself that he wanted a smaller but purer church," Gibson said,

referring to Ratzinger's suggestion that Christianity may need to become

smaller, in terms of its cultural significance, to remain true to itself.

 

As prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith since 1981 and a

close aide to John Paul, Ratzinger wielded enormous power in shaping church

policy, silencing dissident theologians and signing off on virtually every

document that had to do with doctrine.

 

"The small boat of thought of many Christians has often been tossed about by

these waves, thrown from one extreme to the other."

 

Benedict XVI, newly-elected Pope

 

During his tenure, the Vatican was uncompromising in its opposition to ordaining

women, homosexuality and lifting the celibacy requirement for priests. Ratzinger

opposed allowing remarried Catholics to receive Communion and told American

bishops that it was appropriate to deny Communion to those who support such

"manifest grave sin" as abortion and euthanasia.

 

Those policies will continue under Benedict XVI, who in celebrating the

pre-conclave Mass on Monday made clear that the next Pope shouldn't bow to the

"winds of doctrine" that tempted the faithful to stray from the core beliefs of

the church.

 

"The small boat of thought of many Christians has often been tossed about by

these waves, thrown from one extreme to the other," he said, listing Marxism,

liberalism, atheism and relativism -- the ideology that there are no absolute

truths.

 

The homily was classic Ratzinger, and clear evidence that at least doctrinally,

the church he will lead will not divert from current teaching.

 

"Obviously a majority of the cardinals agreed with the analysis that in order to

consolidate John Paul's legacy, the final part had to be done," said John-Peter

Pham, a former Vatican official and author on papal succession.

 

But the style of the Benedict XVI papacy will likely be vastly different from

that of John Paul, the personable archbishop of Krakow, Poland, who trotted the

globe and brought a movie-star quality to the papacy.

 

Most importantly, Ratzinger is 78 -- two decades older than John Paul was when

he was elected in 1978 -- and his health last year was "not that good"

according to the Reverend Thomas Reese, a Vatican expert. He gave no specifics.

 

As a result, Ratzinger's papacy will be viewed as a shorter, transitional one.

 

"In a few years, we could be right back where we were, with a sick, elderly even

perhaps dying Pope," Reese, editor of the Jesuit weekly America magazine said in

an interview before the election.

 

Ratzinger also lacks the pastoral qualities that made John Paul so beloved. He

is a bookish theologian who surprised thousands by choking up as he delivered

John Paul's funeral homily -- a rare glimpse of emotion.

 

Even Ratzinger's brother, Georg, said his brother would be an "entirely

different" Pope than John Paul.

 

"They had a good relationship, but he [Ratzinger] wouldn't have the faculty to

deal with people in such a direct and immediate way and to fascinate them," he

told the German TV station RTL this week.

 

But Pham and other Vatican watchers also say that there is more to Ratzinger

than the world has seen in the past two decades, noting his love of music -- he

is an accomplished pianist -- and his solid credentials as a scholar.

 

Ratzinger's writings and comments give a hint about what his papacy will bring.

 

He has opposed Turkey's bid to join the EU and dismissed demands for European

"multiculturalism" as a "fleeing from what is one's own."

 

He has also made sure John Paul's efforts to reach out to other religions didn't

overstep certain bounds. His 2000 decree "Dominus Iesus," which framed the role

of the Catholic Church in human salvation in an exclusive manner, upset

Protestants, Jews and other non-Christians.

 

Ratzinger further rankled other Christians when he said he didn't want

Protestant churches referred to as "sister churches" by Catholics.

 

Ratzinger has written that Jews were "connected with God in a special way." But

in his book God and the World, he also said "We wait for the instant in which

Israel will say yes to Christ."

 

He has spoken out positively about Islam, saying it has had "moments of great

splendor."

 

While Ratzinger criticized the media for focusing too much on the sins of

priests involved in the church sex abuse scandal, he excoriated the "filth" in

the church in a meditation he penned for the Good Friday Way of the Cross

procession.

 

 

Copyright © 1999-2005 The Taipei Times. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marin Independent Journal

 

 

Analysis: New pope's hard line on church doctrine unlikely to change

By Nicole Winfield

Associated Press

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, April 20, 2005 - VATICAN CITY - A day before he was elected pope,

Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger made clear the type of church he wanted: one that

rigidly maintained the doctrines he himself had upheld as guardian of church

orthodoxy, where there were absolute truths on matters such as abortion,

celibacy and homosexuality.

 

With his election yesterday in one of the fastest papal votes in a century, Pope

Benedict XVI will most certainly build upon continue the uncompromising hard

line on doctrine that he charted under Pope John Paul II.

 

His election will thrill conservatives seeking a consolidation of John Paul's

policies. It will alienate more liberal Catholics, particularly in Europe and

North America, who had hoped that after 26 years, a more progressive pope might

take the helm of the world's 1.1 billion Catholics.

 

And it will likely temper hopes around the world of improved relations with

other religions.

 

"If he continues as pope the way he was as a cardinal, I think we will see a

polarized church," said David Gibson, a former Vatican Radio reporter and

author of "The Coming Catholic Church."

 

"He has said himself that he wanted a smaller but purer church," Gibson said,

referring to Ratzinger's suggestion that Christianity may need to become

smaller, in terms of its cultural significance, to remain true to itself.

 

As prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith since 1981 and a

close aide to John Paul, Ratzinger wielded enormous power in shaping church

policy, silencing dissident theologians and signing off on virtually every

document that had to do with doctrine.

 

During his tenure, the Vatican was uncompromising in its opposition to ordaining

women, homosexuality and lifting the celibacy requirement for priests. Ratzinger

opposed allowing remarried Catholics to receive Communion and told American

bishops that it was appropriate to deny Communion to those who support such

"manifest grave sin" as abortion and euthanasia.

 

Those policies will continue under Benedict XVI, who in celebrating the

pre-conclave Mass on Monday made clear that the next pope shouldn't bow to the

"winds of doctrine" that tempted the faithful to stray from the core beliefs of

the church.

 

"The small boat of thought of many Christians has often been tossed about by

these waves, thrown from one extreme to the other," he said, listing Marxism,

liberalism, atheism and relativism - the ideology that there are no absolute

truths.

 

The homily was classic Ratzinger, and clear evidence that at least doctrinally,

the church he will lead will not divert from current teaching.

 

"Obviously a majority of the cardinals agreed with the analysis that in order to

consolidate John Paul's legacy, the final part had to be done," said John-Peter

Pham, a former Vatican official and author on papal succession.

 

But the style of the Benedict XVI papacy will likely be vastly different from

that of John Paul, the personable archbishop of Krakow, Poland, who trotted the

globe and brought a movie-star quality to the papacy.

 

Most importantly, Ratzinger is 78 - two decades older than John Paul was when he

was elected in 1978 - and his health last year was "not that good" according to

the Rev. Thomas Reese, a Vatican expert. He gave no specifics.

 

As a result, Ratzinger's papacy will be viewed as a shorter, transitional one.

 

"In a few years, we could be right back where we were, with a sick, elderly even

perhaps dying pope," Reese, editor of the Jesuit weekly America magazine said in

an interview before the election.

 

Ratzinger also lacks the pastoral qualities that made John Paul so beloved. He

is a bookish theologian who surprised thousands by choking up as he delivered

John Paul's funeral homily - a rare glimpse of emotion.

 

Pham and other Vatican watchers also say that there is more to Ratzinger than

the world has seen in the past two decades, noting his love of music - he is an

accomplished pianist - and his solid credentials as a scholar.

 

Ratzinger's writings and comments give a hint about what his papacy will bring.

 

He has opposed Turkey's bid to join the European Union and dismissed demands for

European "multiculturalism" as a "fleeing from what is one's own."

 

He has also made sure John Paul's efforts to reach out to other relations didn't

overstep certain bounds. His 2000 decree "Dominus Iesus," which framed the role

of the Catholic Church in human salvation in an exclusive manner, upset

Protestants, Jews and other non-Christians.

 

Ratzinger further rankled other Christians when he said he didn't want

Protestant churches referred to as "sister churches" by Catholics.

 

Ratzinger has written that Jews were "connected with God in a special way." But

in his book "God and the World," he also said "We wait for the instant in which

Israel will say yes to Christ."

 

He has spoken out positively about Islam, saying it has had "moments of great

splendor."

 

 

 

 

 

 

Profile: Cardinals' choice was Vatican's iron hand

 

By Brian Murphy

 

Associated Press

 

VATICAN CITY - Two images of Cardinal Joseph Rat-zinger stood in sharp relief

during the mourning period for the pope he would eventually succeed.

 

With his wispy silver hair blowing in the wind, the German prelate stood before

the world's political and spiritual leaders at John Paul II's funeral April 8

and offered an eloquent, sensitive farewell that moved some to tears.

 

Ten days later - just before Ratzinger and 114 other cardinals entered the

conclave to select the 265th pontiff - he delivered a sharp-edged homily on

strict obedience to church teachings that left liberal Catholics wincing.

 

"He could be a wedge rather than a unifier for the church," said the Rev. Thomas

Reese, editor of the Jesuit weekly magazine America.

 

This was clear in St. Peter's Square moments after the announcement of

Ratzinger's election and the name chosen by the first Germanic pope in 1,000

years: Benedict XVI. Amid the applause were groans and pockets of stunned

silence.

 

Perhaps no member of the conclave evoked such potent opinions - and has stirred

more arguments - as the 78-year-old Ratzinger and the role he's held since

1981: head of the powerful Vatican office that oversees doctrine and takes

action against dissent.

 

"We are moving toward a dictatorship of relativism which does not recognize

anything as for certain and which has as its highest goal one's own ego and

one's own desires," he said Monday in a pre-conclave Mass in memory of John

Paul. The church, he insisted, must defend itself against threats such as

"radical individualism" and "vague religious mysticism."

 

As prefect of the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith, he was the

Vatican's iron hand.

 

His interventions are a roll call of flashpoints for the church: the 1987 order

stripping American theologian the Rev. Charles Curran of the right to teach

because he encouraged dissent; crippling Latin Americans supporting the popular

"liberation theology" movement for alleged Marxist leanings; coming down hard on

efforts to rewrite Scriptures in gender inclusive language.

 

He also shows no flexibility on the church's views on priestly celibacy,

contraception and the ban on ordinations for women.

 

In 1986, he denounced rock music as the "vehicle of anti-religion." In 1988, he

dismissed anyone who tried to find "feminist" meanings in the Bible. Last year,

he told American bishops that it was allowable to deny Communion to those who

support such "manifest grave sin" as abortion and euthanasia.

 

He earned unflattering nicknames such as Panzercardinal, God's rottweiler, and

the Grand Inquisitor. Cartoonists emphasized his deep-set eyes and Italians

lampooned his pronounced German accent.

 

"Indeed, it would be hard to find a Catholic controversy in the past 20 years

that did not somehow involve Joseph Ratzinger," John Allen, a Vatican reporter

for the National Catholic Register, wrote six years ago.

 

But among conservatives, he rose in stature. An online fan club sings his

praises and offers souvenirs with the slogan: "Putting the smackdown on heresy

since 1981."

 

In recent years, he took on issues outside church doctrine. He once called

Buddhism a religion for the self-indulgent. In an interview with the French

magazine Le Figaro last year, he suggested Turkey's bid to join the Europe

Union conflicted with Europe's Christian roots - a view that could unsettle

Vatican attempts to improve relations with Muslims.

 

Critics complain Ratzinger embodies all the conservative instincts of the last

papacy, but without John Paul's charisma and pastoral genius.

 

"I think this is the closest the church can come to human clon-ing," quipped

Gibson.

 

Both John Paul II and his successor were forged by the horrors of World War II

and advanced in the church in the shadow of the Iron Curtain.

 

But the Polish pontiff came from a nation that suffered greatly during the war.

Ratzinger - like many from his generation - carries the burdens and ghosts of

Germany's past.

 

Raised in the oak forest and pine foothills of Bavaria, he said he was enrolled

in Hitler's Nazi youth movement against his will. At the same time, the

policeman's son entered seminary studies in 1939 as a 12-year-old with "joy and

great expectations," according to his memoirs.

 

But in 1943, he was drafted as an assistant to a Nazi anti-aircraft unit in

Munich. Later, he was shipped off to build tank barriers at the

Austian-Hungarian border. He wrote that he escaped recruitment by the dreaded

SS because he and others said they were training to be priests.

 

He deserted in April 1945 and returned home to Traunstein. It was a risky move,

since deserters were shot or hanged. But the Third Reich was collapsing.

 

"The Americans finally arrived in our village," he wrote. "Even though our house

lacked all comfort, they chose it as their headquarters."

 

Ratzinger was identified as a deserter and placed in prisoner of war camp near

Ulm in southern Germany.

 

He and his older brother, Georg, were ordained in 1951. He taught theology and

earned a reputation as a forward-looking prelate and took part in the 1962-65

Second Vatican Council, a major attempt to modernize the faith.

 

In 1977, Ratzinger was appointed bishop of Munich and elevated to cardinal three

months later by Pope Paul VI. He was one of only two cardinals in the latest

conclave that was not chosen by John Paul.

 

The name he took - Benedict - draws a connection to Benedict XV, the Italian

pontiff from 1914 to 1922 who had the difficult task of providing leadership

for Catholic countries on opposite sides of World War I. His declared

neutrality, and his repeated protests against weapons like poison gas angered

both sides.

 

"The name Benedict XVI leaves the possibility open for a more moderate policy,"

said the Swiss theologian Hans Kueng, whose license to teach theology was

revoked by the Vatican in 1979. "Let us, therefore, give him a chance. As with

the president of the USA, we should allow a new pope 100 days to learn."

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marin: Catholic leaders see continuity, stability

 

By Carla Bova

 

IJ reporter

 

When Mary Ann Rickard of Sausalito heard Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger speak at a

Menlo Park seminary six years ago, she knew he was a faithful man who held

strictly to Roman Catholic traditions.

 

"He was a very forceful speaker with clearly defined ideas on what he believed,"

said Rickard, a parishioner at Star of the Sea Catholic Church in Sausalito.

 

She was not surprised yesterday when Ratzinger, of Germany, was elected the new

pope.

 

"I think the church needs a strong conservative leader and Cardinal Ratzinger is

that," Rickard said.

 

Catholic leaders in Marin cited the new pope's consistent support over decades

for church teachings and his lengthy history with the church as indications he

could continue in the path of Pope John Paul II.

 

Ratzinger, 78, served as head of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith,

responsible for enforcing Catholic orthodoxy, since 1981.

 

"The cardinals made a choice for a pope who might not reign as long as a younger

person but will provide continuity and stability in the church," said the Rev.

James Tarantino, pastor at St. Hilary's Church in Tiburon. "He was the

right-hand man when it comes to doctrinal matters of the church. There will not

be too much change in where we have been since he was almost in the driver's

seat for so many years."

 

While the Rev. Paul Rossi, pastor of St. Raphael Church in San Rafael, was "a

bit surprised" that someone from within the curia - departments or ministries

which help govern the church - was named pope, he drew a similar conclusion

that there would be little change.

 

"I thought maybe someone outside of the Vatican itself would be named pope,"

Rossi said. "It does say to us that the cardinals selected someone who will

probably keep the same sort of pastoral approach toward the church as Pope John

Paul II."

 

Still, Rossi expressed a wait-and-see attitude.

 

"We also know the holy spirit works in marvelous ways so we don't know what that

holds," Rossi said. "This man was in a position in the curia which, now that he

is pope, might shed a different light. In his position now, he might have a

different approach to things."

 

The Rev. Kenneth Weare, pastor at St. Rita's Catholic Church in Fairfax, echoed

the sentiment, noting that some religious leaders in the past have changed.

 

"It is true the cardinal does have a well-established reputation for being quite

conservative in the area of doctrine," Weare said. "However, I think that people

who are rightfully concerned about his more traditional approach should take

some hope in the example of others who have come to leadership positions and

have, in those positions, changed their perspective."

 

Weare said when Oscar Ro-mero became archbishop in El Salvador, he was known as

very conservative but in a short time began to change his pastoral approach

after his experience with the people of the country, particularly the poor.

 

"Most likely, Cardinal Rat-zinger will adjust his position because of the lived

experience of the Catholic people worldwide," Weare said.

 

Some said Ratzinger's taking the name Pope Benedict XVI could be interpreted as

a bid to soften his image. Benedict XV, who reigned from 1914 to 1922, was a

moderate following Pius X.

 

"When a pope chooses a name, it generally has some reference to how he is going

to be as pope and gives a clue as to his style and pontificate," Tarantino

said.

 

Tarantino said there was a glimpse of Ratzinger's sensitive side during John

Paul II's funeral when he choked up while delivering the homily.

 

"People have judged him to be, by way of his pronouncements and writings, a

chief promoter of the doctrines," Tarantino said. "But behind all that, I

think, there is the man and that side of him that is pastoral is yet to be seen

by the rest of the world."

 

Weare said Pope Benedict XVI could take a prophetic position of the gospel and

be a strong advocate for human rights and social justice.

 

"He will likely develop a positive ecumenical approach to people of other

religions," Weare said. "After all, Germany is part Lutheran, part Catholic.

There are Muslims and Jews represented in Germany."

 

Contact Carla Bova via e-mail at cbova@marinij.com

 

Copyright and permissions

 

 

 

 

 

Hewing to the hard line

Church to hold fast to doctrines of celibacy, no women priests ANALYSIS

The Associated Press

Updated: 9:03 p.m. ET April 19, 2005VATICAN CITY - A day before he was elected

pope, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger made clear the type of church he wanted: one

that rigidly maintained the doctrines he himself had upheld as guardian of

church orthodoxy, where there were absolute truths on matters such as abortion,

celibacy and homosexuality.

 

advertisement

 

With his election Tuesday in one of the fastest papal votes in a century, Pope

Benedict XVI will most certainly build upon the uncompromising hard line on

doctrine that he charted under Pope John Paul II.

 

His election will thrill conservatives seeking a consolidation of John Paul¹s

policies. It will alienate more liberal Catholics, particularly in Europe and

North America, who had hoped that after 26 years, a more progressive pope might

take the helm of the world¹s 1.1 billion Catholics.

 

And it will likely temper hopes around the world of improved relations with

other religions.

 

Forecast: ŒA polarized church¹

³If he continues as pope the way he was as a cardinal, I think we will see a

polarized church,² said David Gibson, a former Vatican Radio reporter and

author of ³The Coming Catholic Church.²

 

³He has said himself that he wanted a smaller but purer church,² Gibson said,

referring to Ratzinger¹s suggestion that Christianity may need to become

smaller, in terms of its cultural significance, to remain true to itself.

 

As prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith since 1981 and a

close aide to John Paul, Ratzinger wielded enormous power in shaping church

policy, silencing dissident theologians and signing off on virtually every

document that had to do with doctrine.

 

During his tenure, the Vatican was uncompromising in its opposition to ordaining

women, homosexuality and lifting the celibacy requirement for priests. Ratzinger

opposed allowing remarried Catholics to receive Communion and told American

bishops that it was appropriate to deny Communion to those who support a

³manifest grave sin² such as abortion and euthanasia.

 

No surrender to Œwinds of doctrine¹

Those policies will continue under Benedict XVI, who in celebrating the

pre-conclave Mass on Monday made clear that the next pope shouldn¹t bow to the

³winds of doctrine² that tempted the faithful to stray from the core beliefs of

the church.

 

³The small boat of thought of many Christians has often been tossed about by

these waves, thrown from one extreme to the other,² he said, listing Marxism,

liberalism, atheism and relativism ‹ the ideology that there are no absolute

truths.

 

The homily was classic Ratzinger, and clear evidence that at least doctrinally,

the church he will lead will not divert from current teaching.

 

³Obviously a majority of the cardinals agreed with the analysis that in order to

consolidate John Paul¹s legacy, the final part had to be done,² said John-Peter

Pham, a former Vatican official and author on papal succession.

 

But the style of the Benedict XVI papacy will likely be vastly different from

that of John Paul, the personable archbishop of Krakow, Poland, who trotted the

globe and brought a movie-star quality to the papacy.

 

The age factor

Most importantly, Ratzinger is 78 ‹ two decades older than John Paul was when he

was elected in 1978 ‹ and his health last year was ³not that good² according to

the Rev. Thomas Reese, a Vatican expert. He gave no specifics.

 

As a result, Ratzinger¹s papacy will be viewed as a shorter, transitional one.

 

³In a few years, we could be right back where we were, with a sick, elderly even

perhaps dying pope,² Reese, editor of the Jesuit weekly America magazine said in

an interview before the election.

 

Ratzinger also lacks the pastoral qualities that made John Paul so beloved. He

is a bookish theologian who surprised thousands by choking up as he delivered

John Paul¹s funeral homily ‹ a rare glimpse of emotion.

 

 

Even Ratzinger¹s brother, Georg, said his brother would be an ³entirely

different² pope than John Paul.

 

³They had a good relationship, but he (Ratzinger) wouldn¹t have the faculty to

deal with people in such a direct and immediate way and to fascinate them,² he

told the German TV station RTL this week.

 

But Pham and other Vatican watchers also say that there is more to Ratzinger

than the world has seen in the past two decades, noting his love of music ‹ he

is an accomplished pianist ‹ and his solid credentials as a scholar.

 

Stands rankle Christians

Ratzinger¹s writings and comments give a hint about what his papacy will bring.

He has opposed Turkey¹s bid to join the European Union and dismissed demands

for European ³multiculturalism² as a ³fleeing from what is one¹s own.²

 

He has also made sure John Paul¹s efforts to reach out to other religions didn¹t

overstep certain bounds. His 2000 decree ³Dominus Iesus,² which framed the role

of the Catholic Church in human salvation in an exclusive manner, upset

Protestants, Jews and other non-Christians.

 

Ratzinger further rankled other Christians when he said he didn¹t want

Protestant churches referred to as ³sister churches² by Catholics.

 

He has written that Jews were ³connected with God in a special way.² But in his

book ³God and the World,² he also said ³We wait for the instant in which Israel

will say yes to Christ.²

 

He has spoken out positively about Islam, saying it has had ³moments of great

splendor.²

 

While Ratzinger criticized the media for focusing too much on the sins of

priests involved in the church sex abuse scandal, he excoriated the ³filth² in

the church in a meditation he penned for the Good Friday Way of the Cross

procession.

 

 

 

 

 

 Posted on Sat, Apr. 23, 2005

 

 

 

Women in the church

Many see changes on the horizon for Catholics with more nuns working in local dioceses as well as the Vatican

 

Herald Staff and Wire Reports

 

As the 115 cardinals gathered in Rome this week and chose Cardinal Joseph

Ratzinger of Germany as new pope, Sister Cathi Merck led the 105 nuns in Mount

St. Benedict monastery in Crookston in choosing a new prioress to succeed her.

 

While glad that Ratzinger chose the founder of their order as his namesake in

becoming Pope Benedict XVI, Merck said the Benedictines at the Mount also hope

that he will listen to the hopes of many women in the church for expanded

roles.

 

Her own monastery's members don't only teach school and care for the sick and

elderly - the traditional ministries of nuns - but three also are the

administrators of parishes in the Crookston diocese.

 

With only half as many priests as parishes, and with 42,000 Catholics, the

diocese has turned to nuns to help in ways they never had before.

 

More nuns nationwide practice professions that also represent new directions in

the past 15 years or so. For example, Sister Anita Whalen from the Mount is a

dentist in Warren, Minn.

 

Women in Vatican

 

While Benedict XVI is expected to continue John Paul II's forceful upholding of

the tradition of a priesthood of unmarried males, there is an unprecedented

number of women in roles in the Vatican, too, news sources say.

 

Merck has been prioress at the Mount for six years and while eligible for a

four-year second term, she is stepping aside for health reasons.

 

After three days of prayer and talk, about 79 sisters decided by consensus that

God was leading them to choose Sister Lenore Paschke as the 11th prioress of

the Crookston "house."

 

Paschke, a member of the Crookston monastery since 1956, has several

postgraduate degrees, including a master's degree in education from Bemidji

State University.

 

The chaplain in St. Mary's Regional Health Center in Detroit Lakes, Minn.,

Paschke will take over her new duties in Crookston on July 31.

 

Mount St. Benedict is one of 16 Benedictine communities of women in the

Federation of St. Gertrude, Merck said. While there are few new women joining

the monasteries, she and other members believe there is lots of work and new

jobs they could be doing in and for the church, Merck said.

 

Women's inroads

 

In the wake of the new pope's selection and in a world dominated by men, some

smart, powerful Catholic women are making inroads, Knight Ridder Newpapers

reported.

 

"If you knock the issue of ordination off the table, women have advanced

significantly," even at the Vatican, Sister Mary Ann Walsh, the spokeswoman for

the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, said in Rome last week.

 

The Vatican employee who established the Web site where Pope John Paul II's

teachings are posted in six languages is an American Franciscan nun, Sister

Judith Loebelein, nicknamed "Sister Web."

 

An Italian Salesian nun, Sister Enrica Rossana, was named last year as the

third-ranking official in the Vatican office overseeing religious men and women

- the first time a woman was promoted to a position held by priests since the

Roman Curia was established in the 16th century.

 

"The manpower shortage in the church - there just aren't enough priests - will

lead to major employment of women," predicted Paul Hofmann, author of "The

Vatican's Women."

 

The percentages

 

Women still make up only 10 percent of the 400 staffers in the Vatican's most

important divisions, the Catholic News Service reported last year. Under church

law, those offices are led by cardinals or bishops. In the United States, women

account for more than 25 percent of the top positions in U.S. Catholic

dioceses.

 

But women working at the Vatican say they see change coming.

 

"Things are a lot slower than they are in the States, but there is a direction"

of giving women more visibility in Vatican posts, said Joan

Collemacine-Parenti, a Philadelphia native who earned a doctorate and taught

romance languages at Temple University and now has worked at the Vatican for

more than 30 years. As a language specialist, she supervises translations for

publications of the Pontifical Council for the Family.

 

She said Pope John Paul II supported women in ways beyond job advancement,

noting that the Vatican beefed up maternity-leave compensation and flexibility

for female employees.

 

Degree pursuits

 

Women's advancement at the Vatican is due in part to their pursuit of degrees at

pontifical universities. Sister Mary Pierre Jean Wilson, 48, a member of the

Religious Sisters of Mercy of Alma, Mich., has worked at the Vatican for seven

years, after earning a canon law degree in Rome.

 

She's the first and only female lawyer to work in the office dealing with

Catholic universities for the Congregation for Catholic Education. Most

recently, she helped create a computerized list of more than 1,300 Catholic

universities and institutes of higher learning across the world. (India, the

United States and the Philippines top the list.)

 

"In the past, women didn't have the qualifications," Wilson said. "I'm sure it

was in the pope's mind that women could fill many jobs ... . The Holy Father

wanted us to live our vocations to the fullest."

 

Collemacine-Parenti said women are gaining influence in Vatican advisory

commissions and departments, some of which originated since the Second Vatican

Council in the 1960s or under John Paul II.

 

Papal council influence

 

Women's influence is greater among papal councils that deal with issues such as

health care and ecumenical dialogue, with women comprising 35 percent of the

staff of 11 papal councils, the Catholic News Service reported a year ago.

 

In 1994, the pope created the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences, a

collection of scientists, economists and professors. Ten years later, he named

Harvard University law professor Mary Ann Glendon to lead the panel, which

advises the Vatican on social policy. Hers is the highest advisory position

held by a woman at the Vatican.

 

Last year, John Paul II also named two women - an American nun and a German

laywoman - for the first time to the Vatican's top theology group, the

International Theological Commission. The nun, Sister Sara Butler, 65, a

Toledo, Ohio, native who taught at Chicago's Mundelein Seminary and now is at

St. Joseph Seminary in Yonkers, N.Y., attended her first commission meeting

last October at the Vatican.

 

"I think the pope was eager to make sure women are involved," Butler said last

week from New York.

 

At the lectern

 

At John Paul II's funeral, women appeared at the lectern to lead some of the

prayers. Their appearance was jarring, if only because the stage was so

dominated by the men who run the church. In the United States, it's typical to

see altar girls and boys assist the priest at Mass, but Vatican officials still

prefer male servers.

 

And there's little expectation that women will be ordained anytime soon. In the

final decade of his pontificate, John Paul II urged Catholics around the world

to stop discussing the issue. Many American bishops took that as a sign that

they should clamp down on clergy and scholars who raised the issue of female

priests.

 

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"What neither the bishops nor the feminists realize is that women are running

the church," the Rev. Thomas Reese, a Jesuit priest and editor of America

magazine, said last week in Rome. "Women are running parishes, and women pass

on the faith, as mothers and teachers."

 

 

© 2005 Grand Forks Herald and wire service sources. All Rights Reserved.

http://www.grandforks.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New era for the Catholic Church begins

 

By Sandi Dolbee

UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

7:08 p.m. April 19, 2005

 

VATICAN CITY ­ Pope Benedict XVI stepped onto the balcony overlooking St.

Peter's Square and into Catholic history Tuesday, becoming the new leader of a

billion-plus-member church.

 

Catholic cardinals stayed the course, electing as the church's 265th pope a man

who spent the past 24 years as the chief enforcer of church dogma. He was one

of Pope John Paul II's closest allies during his lifetime and became the most

visible face of the Vatican after his death.

 

 

Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger of Germany, head of the Vatican's powerful

Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith since 1981 and dean of the Cardinal

of Colleges, was elected on the second day of the conclave ­ and just about 24

hours after the doors of the Sistine Chapel were closed and the secret

balloting began. Tuesday evening, he beamed and waved to a cheering audience

that spilled out of St. Peter's Square.

 

"Dear brothers and sisters, after the great Pope John Paul II, the cardinals

have elected me, a simple and humble worker in the vineyard of the Lord,"

Ratzinger told tens of thousands of people who clapped, shouted tributes and

waved a United Nations of flags.

 

Ratzinger, who turned 78 on Saturday, was one of the favorite sons leading up to

the conclave, especially among traditionalists. And despite reports of a

liberal-conservative standoff among the 115 cardinal electors, they apparently

were able to come to a decision after only a few ballots.

 

Cardinal Joachim Meisner told some reporters that the new pope was elected on

the fourth ballot, and that Ratzinger got more than the required two-third

support.

 

"It was done without an electoral battle, and without propaganda," said the

archbishop of Cologne, who seemed unconcerned about commenting despite the

cardinals taking a vow of silence prior to the conclave. "For me it was a

miracle."

 

Reaction through the evening was a jumble of jubilation, thanksgiving, surprise

and disappointment from Catholics in St. Peter's Square who rejoiced that Pope

Benedict he would hold the line and worried that he would further split the

largest Christian church in the world.

 

"He's the right one for the church and the world," said the Rev. Anthony Shing,

a 33-year-old priest from Myanmar, formerly Burma. "He's a very, very good and

moral man."

 

Betsy Samuels, a 21-year-old student Marquette University in Milwaukee, also was

delighted. "I think it's a great decision," she said. "He'll uphold the

teachings of John Paul II and uphold the conservative values."

 

But a 31-year-old Catholic from Monterrey, Mexico, said that Ratzinger will not

be good for a church struggling with issues ranging from the role of women in

the church, celibacy for priests and birth control. "I don't think he'll be

changing what needs to be changing," said Edgar Munoz Ledo.

 

Two San Diego residents who were in St. Peter's Square symbolized the mix of

opinions.

 

Samar Naoum, a 25-year-old Chaldean Catholic from El Cajon, has pushed for

Ratzinger since the conclave began on Monday. Tuesday night, he celebrated.

 

"Anybody the Holy Spirit would have given us I would have been happy with

because it was the will of God," Naoum said. "But you can always get a little

more excited when the will of God is also your will."

 

Father Joe Carroll, head of Saint Vincent de Paul Village, had hoped for a pope

from Mexico. When he heard it was Ratzinger, he worried that he would be too

old to be a vital pontiff.

 

"I think a lot of people are disappointed because of his age," said Carroll, who

arrived in Rome on Monday courtesy of a free ticket from a friend. "He's

definitely part of the old regime," Carroll said, noting that Ratzinger is one

of only three members of the College of Cardinals not appointed by John Paul

II.

 

But the bottom line, said the 63-year-old monsignor, is that the pope is the

pope. "We just don't see him as the head of an institution. We see him as the

representation of Christ on earth," he said.

 

Others suggested Ratzinger would be a transitional pope, helping whoever comes

next step out of the giant shadow cast by John Paul's 26-year papacy, one of

the longest in history. "We'll be back here in three or four years," said

Monsignor Terry Fleming, 58, an aide to Los Angeles Cardinal Roger Mahony.

 

Observers agreed that this was not a vote for change. "I think it's very clearly

a vote for continuity," the Rev. Thomas Reese, a Jesuit priest and editor of

America magazine, told CNN.

 

Reform-minded Catholics said their hearts sank when they heard the news. And

Sister Joan Chittister, a Benedictine nun from Pennsylvania, said she was

likewise concerned.

 

"I can't deny the anxiety," Chittister said Tuesday night. "But at the same

time, I continue to hope in the Holy Spirit."

 

Ratzinger's star began rising on the public scene when he gave a moving homily,

drawing repeated applause, at Pope John Paul II's funeral Mass on April 8. John

Paul died April 2 at the age of 84. Then, on Monday morning, he delivered the

homily at the opening Mass for the conclave ­ giving a get-tough talk about

holding the line on church teachings and decrying "a dictatorship of

relativism."

 

But friends described Ratzinger as compassionate, intelligent, shy, warm and

gracious. Last week, his deputy praised him and defended him against depictions

of Ratzinger being divisive and combative.

 

"I have to tell you, I think the image of him as 'panzer cardinal' is completely

ludicrous," said the Rev. J. Augustine Di Noia, a U.S. priest who is

undersecretary of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, referring to

a moniker comparing Ratzinger to a German tank.

 

"Something that strikes me very much is his serenity," Di Noia said.

 

This historic conclave ­ the first of this millennium ­ was marked by both its

shortness and its confusion.

 

By tradition, the ballots are burned as a way of communicating with the outside

world what is happening inside the secret gathering ­ black smoke is for no

decision; white smoke for a successful election.

 

On Monday night, the puffs above the Sistine Chapel's roofline wafted pale,

giving an initial burst of excitement that a pope had been picked on the first

ballot. At noontime Tuesday, the smoke from the morning ballots was clearly

black. Then, at about 5:45 p.m., new puffs began to emerge that were grayish.

 

"It looks white," said Carroll, peering hard into the sky. As more smoke

emerged, the color grew fairer. "That's white," Carroll said. "Yeah, I would

say it is."

 

About 15 minutes later, the bells began to sound. "We have a pope!" Carroll said

as the crowd roared.

 

He began to choke up. "I'm very excited," he said. Forty minutes later, the

doors to the center balcony of St. Peter's Basilica opened. The rest is

history.

 

John Paul II was the first non-Italian pope in more than 450 years. The

selection of Ratzinger makes that two in a row ­ and also returns the papacy to

a German for the first time in nearly 1,000 years. A group of young Germans

celebrated under their country's flag with handshakes and grins.

 

"We hoped it would be," said Bastian Dupps, an 18-year-old German who is going

to school in Rome. But he said he didn't actually believe it would really

happen until Cardinal Jorge Arturo Medina Estevez of Chile read Ratzinger's

name. "We're very proud."

 

The new Pope Benedict XVI will be installed at 10 a.m. Sunday at St. Peter's

Basilica (1 a.m. PDT). Tuesday night, he had dinner with cardinals and decided

to spend the night at St. Martha's House, where the cardinal electors have

stayed this week, rather than move into the papal apartments. This morning, he

will celebrate a Mass with cardinals at the Sistine Chapel.

 

Pilgrims, priests, nuns and others spent the day at St. Peter's Square praying,

reading, playing cards and watching for smoke.

 

Cecilia Henrich, 43, a Catholic school teacher, wrote in a journal. "We have

four children and they're back in Iowa and we want to keep it for them," she

said.

 

Tuesday night, she had an ending for the story. And she, and others here, became

part of a chapter in Catholic history.

 

Josh Miechels, a 23-year-old Sydney resident, was so overwhelmed that he jumped

up and down like a child at Christmas. "I can't believe it. I'm standing here

in St. Peter's Square to see Pope Benedict. It's incredible."

 

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

 

Find this article at:

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/world/20050419-1908-cnspope.html

 

 

 

NEWS FEATURE:

The New Pope

April 22, 2005   Episode no. 834

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/religionandethics/week834/news.html

 

BOB ABERNETHY, anchor: Quickly and, for some, controversially, Cardinal Joseph

Ratzinger was this week elected to succeed John Paul II as the 265th pope of

the Roman Catholic Church. He chose the name Benedict XVI.

 

Kim Lawton is just back from Rome.

 

KIM LAWTON: The election greatly pleased U.S. Catholic conservatives who expect

Pope Benedict XVI will continue upholding the Church's traditional teachings.

Catholic liberals, who were hoping for more openness in the papacy, were

disappointed.

 

The shortest conclave in a century began on Monday, when the 115

cardinal-electors entered the Sistine Chapel and pledged an oath of absolute

secrecy and obedience to the guidance of the Holy Spirit.

 

Four ballots later, they selected one of John Paul II's closest advisors, the

powerful and conservative Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger.

 

Dr. CHESTER GILLIS (Theology Professor and Chair, Georgetown University): No one

knows exactly what he'll do. But they anticipate he will carry on the policies

of John Paul II. So if you're looking for change, this is probably not the

papacy for it. If you're looking for continuity, this is the papacy, and in

some ways it extends the legacy of the papacy of John Paul II for another

perhaps 10 or 15 years, however long God allows this pope to live.

 

LAWTON: Among many of the world's 1.1 billion Roman Catholics, there was great

joy. Father Joseph Fessio, provost of Ave Maria University in Florida, was a

student of Ratzinger's and published the cardinal's writings at Ignatius Press.

He says he can scarcely believe his good friend was chosen.

 

Reverend JOSEPH FESSIO, S.J. (Provost, Ave Maria University): But I was waiting,

saying, "I wonder, I wonder. Could it be, could it be?" And I saw the curtains

open. Once I heard "Ratzinger" I just burst into tears. It was so amazing to

see someone that I've known, someone that I've talked to, someone that I've

been with there, dressed up like the pope -- because he was the pope. And the

joy for me is knowing what a gift this is for the Church.

 

LAWTON: But within the Church's more liberal wing, including in America,

Cardinal Ratzinger's election has provoked great concern about what the future

may hold.

 

Dr. GILLIS: Groups such as women who have been interested perhaps in higher

office in the Church clearly are going to be disappointed in this decision and

be disenfranchised in that way. The gay community, the Catholic gay community,

will not find a friend in Cardinal Ratzinger. Those who want greater

collegiality or participation by the laity in the decision-making process --

that remains to be seen, but it's unlikely that he'll go in that direction.

 

LAWTON: As head of the Vatican's Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith,

Cardinal Ratzinger was the guardian of church orthodoxy. Part of his job was to

clamp down on dissident activists and theologians.

 

Dr. GILLIS: Some in the theological community -- a shudder went down their spine

when this pope was elected because he's been a very vigilant watchdog about

orthodoxy, and he's been fairly proactive and aggressive about theologians who

might deviate from certain Church doctrines or who might have experimental

notions or push the edges of theology, which the academy is always invited to

do.

 

LAWTON: While this troubles some theologians, others believe Pope Benedict XVI

needs to preserve the traditional teachings of the Church.

 

Rev. FESSIO: We cannot allow people who are commissioned to teach the truths of

the faith to dilute or disturb or confuse that faith or the people they are

preaching to. And so, obviously, he is going to make as his norm not his own

opinion, but the received, authoritative teachings of Jesus Christ that come

through his Church.

 

LAWTON: Benedict begins his papacy with a long experience in the Vatican's

massive bureaucracy -- the Curia. Experts say this will be an advantage as he

takes over as the Church's top administrator.

 

Reverend THOMAS REESE, S.J. (Editor-in-Chief, America Magazine): Because he's so

familiar with the Vatican Curia, he can make decisions right away about who will

be appointed to what offices, and he knows which in the Vatican Curia he wants

to listen to and which one's advice he's not going to pay any attention to.

Cardinal Wojtyla, when he was elected, kidded that he had to find his way

around the building.

 

LAWTON: But that administrative experience may also bring some challenges to his

new role as the Church's universal pastor.

 

Dr. GILLIS: He's been a bureaucrat in Rome for 25 years -- longer than 25 years.

So he doesn't, I mean, I don't know that he has a sense of Catholicism on the

ground in a pastoral context, where real Catholics in genuine situations of

families and communities are struggling with issues that the Church is

suggesting or mandating that they follow.

 

LAWTON: Benedict has begun outlining the priorities of his papacy. In a Mass

before the conclave began, he warned of the dangers challenging faith,

including liberalism, atheism, and what he called a "dictatorship of

relativism."

 

After his election he said his primary task would be pursuing ecumenical and

interfaith dialogue. He also affirmed his commitment to carrying out the

reforms of the Second Vatican Council.

 

Rev. REESE: Certainly, this is an extremely important moment in the life of the

Catholic Church because this is the pope who is going to lead the church in the

21st century. He's going to have to deal with all sorts of controversial issues

and decide: is he going to allow more open discussion, or are there certain

topics that are simply off the table and can't even be discussed?

 

Rev. FESSIO: He really combines extraordinary talent and ability with genuine

humility. I want people to know that's the kind of person he is. There's no one

I know who's ever been in his presence, who has worked with him or spent time

with him, who did not come away feeling ennobled.

 

LAWTON: Benedict said this week he felt John Paul's presence holding his hand

and urging him not to be afraid of the challenges ahead. After Sunday's formal

installation service, on Monday (April 25) Pope Benedict will begin receiving

official delegations.

 

 

 

 © 2005 Educational Broadcasting Corporation. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

ABC Online

 

AM - Joseph Ratzinger: a biography

 

[This is the print version of story

http://www.abc.net.au/am/content/2005/s1349379.htm]

 

 

AM - Wednesday, 20 April , 2005  08:08:00

Reporter: Alison Caldwell

TONY EASTLEY: The world's media is now scrutinising every detail of the life of

the Bavarian, Joseph Ratzinger.

 

He has devoted most of his life to the Church, but somewhere in his 78 years

he's found time to learn the piano, and plays very well by all reports, with a

preference for Beethoven.

 

And like the late Pope John Paul, he's a very accomplished linguist, speaking

ten languages.

 

Alison Caldwell has been looking at the life and times of Joseph Ratzinger, now

Pope Benedict XVI.

 

ALISON CALDWELL: Nicknamed "God's Rottweiler" and "Joe the Rat", Cardinal Joseph

Ratzinger is one of the best known and, in some cases, feared leaders of the

Catholic Church.

 

Born in Bavaria, the son of a policeman, Joseph Ratzinger was ordained into the

priesthood in 1951, before becoming the Archbishop of Munich and then Cardinal

in the late seventies.

 

Known for his high intellect, Cardinal Ratzinger was chosen to head the Holy

Office of the Inquisition in 1981, now known as the Congregation for the

Doctrine of the Faith. This is where he established his reputation as an

enforcer of orthodoxy in the Catholic Church.

 

One of his first campaigns was against liberation theology, a movement popular

with priests mainly in Latin America who believed the Church had a duty to

liberate the poor from oppression.

 

Cardinal Ratzinger saw it as a threat to the Church. He publicly criticised its

leaders and sacked bishops who were sympathetic to it. He once described

homosexuality as a "tendency" towards an "intrinsic moral evil." During the US

election he called for pro-abortion politicians to be denied communion.

 

With his conservative track record, many Catholics fear Cardinal Ratzinger could

become a divisive figure in the papacy. But others argue that it's wrong to

prejudge him.

 

Margaret Hebblethwaite is from the international catholic newspaper The Tablet.

 

MARGARET HEBBLETHWAITE: It's a moment for saying to Catholics throughout the

world who are feeling dismayed ­ and there are many of them I'm sure ­ not to

be dismayed.

 

For one thing, he is very much better than his image because he's been

identified with just one thing, which is the Inquisition of Theologians. He's

actually an enormous capable and intelligent and devout man and good man, a

morally good man.

 

Let's not judge him in advance, and let's remember that what unites us is far

more important than what divides us, but it's also a time for the conservatives

to remember not to crow victory. This is a man who has to unite the Church, that

is his role.

 

ALISON CALDWELL: Father Thomas Reese is the editor of the Catholic Weekly, the

America magazine. He says Cardinal Ratzinger will provide continuation from the

papacy of John Paul II.

 

THOMAS REESE: Both of them were academics, both theologians, both respected one

another highly, Cardinal Ratzinger was practically John Paul's right hand man,

especially when it came to Church teaching and doctrine. So certainly he will

be a vote for continuity in the Church.

 

He has a different personality than John Paul II. You know, it will be a papacy

that will see probably less travel and, you know, very different personality

but certainly the same teaching, the same programs, the same policies.

 

TONY EASTLEY: Father Thomas Reese, the Editor of the Catholic weekly, the

America magazine.

 

 

 

© 2005 Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Copyright information: http://abc.net.au/common/copyrigh.htm

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